Pupil Premium 

Pupil premium strategy statement 2017-18  

1.   Summary information

School

 

Academic Year

2017-18

Total PP budget

£63,360

Date of most recent PP Review

September 2017

Total number of pupils

212

Number of pupils eligible for PP

FSM, Ever 6, CiC (2017-18)

41

Date for next internal review of this strategy

September 2018

 

2.   Current attainment

 

Pupils eligible for PP (your school)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

% achieving in reading, writing and maths

25%

67%

making progress in reading (ASP progress score)

-7.06

+0.33

making progress in writing (ASP progress score)

-8.99

+0.17

making progress in maths (ASP progress score)

-4.55

+0.28

 

3.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

A.    

Entry profile data indicates low levels on entry in communication and readiness for school measures for all children. School average GLD at the end of Reception year is 38% based on 7 years data. Young children’s Oracy has been identified as a Trust wide objective for development in 2017-18. Dialogic Book Talk Project commencing 01.2018

B.    

Children have a limited experience and enjoyment of reading before starting school and whilst at school. Subsequently children make poor progress in reading which impacts on their ability in comprehension and as writers as well as their confidence and self-esteem as learners.

C.

The adjusted pitch of whole class learning in maths in order for all children to access learning may be resulting in lower than expected rates of progress and outcomes in maths for Middle Prior Attaining (MPA) and More Able (MA) children (10 of the 30 children involved are PP)

D.

Data indicates that some PP children require greater levels of support with learning in class.

E.

Some children’s lack of confidence in literacy skills results in them being disinterested, reluctant and unconfident writers. This barrier has been identified in early juniors

F.

Some PP children struggle to make expected levels of progress in spelling and phonics

4.   Desired outcomes

 

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

 

A.    

Children make better than expected progress from entry level assessment during Reception class and are then on track with GLD. Assessed from learning journals and teacher assessment

·         Achieving GLD

 

B.    

Children make expected or better rates of progress in reading. Assessed from class comprehension assessment and SPTO data and from SATS.

·         In class comprehension assessment data

·         Progress as indicated by Accelerated reader data

·         Outcomes in SATS

 

C.    

Children are able to make better than expected levels of progress in maths than they may otherwise do if they were taught as part of a whole class. Assessed from class testing and SATS

·         All identified children achieve EXS in end of key stage 2 SATS

·         The majority achieve a high scaled score thus indicating better than expected levels of progress.

·         A number of identified children achieve GDS

 

D.    

PP children make expected or better progress within whole class teaching activity (prioritised support)

Assessed from work scrutiny, teacher assessment in all subject areas.

·         Data outcomes improve to be in line with cohort.

 

E.     

Identified children reengage with writing and enjoy the process of producing writing. Their perception of themselves as writers is changed. They enjoy writing and develop confidence.

Assessed from standards in writing produced from the project and after.

·         Children produce writing of an expected standard that they are proud of and that inspires them to write more.

 

F.     

Identified children make accelerated progress in aspects of spelling and phonics. Assessed using NESSY data outcomes

·         Data outcomes improve to be in line with cohort

 

 

5.   Planned expenditure

Academic year

2017-18

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

    i.   Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

A. Children make better than expected progress from entry level assessment during Reception class and are then on track with GLD

School is involved in a Trust wide initiative to raise standards in oracy for younger children through Dialogic Book Talk

Staff training as part of the trust

Follow up in house training within the team.

The National Strategies Early Years Communication, Language and Literacy Essential Knowledge.

https://m.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/default/files/folders/documents/childreneducationandfamilies/informationforchildcareproviders/Toolkit/Dialogic_book_talk_guide.pdf

 

The educational value of dialogic talk in whole-class dialogue

Cambridge University

http://oer.educ.cam.ac.uk/wiki/The_educational_value_of_dialogic_talk_in_whole-class_dialogue

The initiative will be conducted and assessed alongside the MAT project.

This will involve independent trainers and assessors visiting school for training and sharing good practice as well as assessing rates of progress.

Evidence of progress should be apparent in children’s learning Journals and end of year assessments.

Nikki Winch

At the end of summer term.

In line with MAT project assessments.

Predominantly staff training and resourcing. Staff budgeted cost: 

£2000

B. Children make expected or better rates of progress in reading

School has invested in Accelerated Reader scheme for use across key stage 2.

Other linked initiatives include  kindle reading club.

School decided that we needed a robust and accurate structure that children would enjoy to encourage increased volume of reading. The scheme also encourages reading for meaning and develops comprehension skills. Children enjoy the competition element and can self regulate the quantity of books they read and understand the progress that they are making.

https://v1.educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/uploads/pdf/Accelerated_Reader_(Final).pdf

(secondary school research example)

 

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/InterventionReport/12

positive effect on comprehension skills

The programme produces reports by pupil, class or identified cohort so progress can be monitored at any point in the term. This enables comparison of progress rates to ensure that implementation is as effective in all classes for all groups. Monitoring of progress will be assigned to a member of the English leadership team. Outcomes can then be monitored by SLT and Governors

 

 

 

Lisa Gardner

Data is reviewed half-termly.

Accelerated reader licencing, purchase of new book stock for AR, book storage, staff training. budgeted cost: 

£8000

Children make expected or better rates of progress in reading

School is introducing whole class teacher led reading replacing guided reading.

A progression of texts will be followed throughout school. All children will have a copy of the book in their hands to read during the reading sessions, significant amount of teaching time will be given to this initiative.

Children will read as a whole class at least 6 texts a year.

The rational for this move lies in the fact that we know that not enough of our children are reading at home, or are read with at home, so the only place where they are going to experience a story is in school. We wish it wasn’t this way but we have to develop their love of reading as well as their ability as readers and we have to ensure that they become engaged in reading and learning from texts. We expect that this will impact significantly on standards in writing as well.

https://www.tes.com/news/tes-magazine/tes-magazine/whats-best-path-take-your-primary-reading-strategy

 

 

The English Leadership team will pilot the scheme in Spring 1 and then roll out for all classes in Spring 2.

Charlotte Goatman

 

Lisa Gardner

 

Claire Powell

 

All classes purchasing whole class sets of reading books (at least 42 sets across the school) and storage for books. budgeted cost: 

£8000

   ii.   Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

C. Children are able to make better than expected levels of progress in maths than they may otherwise do if they were taught as part of a whole class.

From data and teacher assessment a group of children from year 5 and year 6 are identified to receive maths teaching in a small differentiated group every day.

The children will be taught a parallel curriculum but at deeper and more challenging level.

School has done a great deal of work on the development of mastery in maths. This is a whole class teaching approach to maths. In recent times our MPA and MA children have sometimes not met their full potential therefore this teaching approach ensures differentiation in curriculum and teaching in all maths lessons to ensure rates of progress and children being consistently challenged to meet their full potential.

·         Monitoring of maths teaching by maths leadership team.

·         Scrutiny of data outcomes each half term.

·         Scrutiny of work.

·         External moderation by TPAT maths lead (Chris Gould)

Dan Moore

 

Claire Powell

 

Charlotte Goatman

 

Vicky Tonkin

Data is reviewed half termly

Approximate proportion of Dan Moore’s salary. budgeted cost: 

£15,000

D. PP children make expected or better progress within whole class teaching activity

Pupil Premium children are prioritised for feedback and support by the teacher and support staff in all lessons.

Staff have a list of children assigned to them to prioritise and ensure feedback has taken place with. (staff lanyards)

Pupil Premium children are prioritised when 1-2-1 reading is available from reading volunteers.

School has identified that support for learning in the form of feedback that takes place in the lesson as learning is taking place is likely to have the greatest impact on learning.

School has restructured its marking and assessment procedures to place emphasis on formative assessment in lessons. This includes the deployment of staff to focus on PP children for feedback.

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/teaching-learning-toolkit/feedback/

 

·         Monitoring of the progress of PP children is part of the monitoring schedule each term

·         Monitoring of provision for PP children in lessons is part of the monitoring schedule each half term.

·         Work scrutiny for PP children in maths and English takes place each half term as part of the monitoring schedule.

Jeremy Walden

Data is reviewed half termly.

Deployment of support staff and assessment of their impact takes place each term

A proportion of the support staff salaries in all classes. budgeted cost: 

£30,000

E. Identified children reengage with writing and enjoy the process of producing writing. Their perception of themselves as writers is changed. They enjoy writing and develop confidence.

School is working with a writing coach from Story Republic on a one off project.

Children (9 of the group of 15 are PP children) will take part in 3 writing activity days with the writing coach. They will create their own piece of writing in response to a visit, dram, discussion, research and coaching.  

A proportion of children who struggle with the rigour of expectation in writing at the start of key stage 2 can sometimes disengage with writing. Their reduced confidence leads to reduced enjoyment of writing and them failing to make progress. The children don’t consider writing as an enjoyable activity. The children done regularly produce work that they are proud of.

The project seeks to help children reengage with writing, enjoy writing and regain confidence in their ability as writers.

·         The chosen writing coach has a wealth of proven experience as a leader in English.

·         The coach is part of Story Republic which is part of Kernow Arts Partnership.

 

Jeremy Walden

 

Rob lane

 

At the end of the project, end of Spring 2.

 Rob Lane as writing coach, visit and resources, TA support for three days. budgeted cost: 

£1500

 F. Identified children make accelerated progress in aspects of spelling and phonics.

School has purchased additional NESSY software licenses and timetabled in additional NESSY sessions for children to work on spelling and phonics.

 

 

The programme which was originally designed to support Dyslexic children has been shown to have impact for all children who are struggling in this area.

https://www.nessy.com/uk/

This provision will be monitored by our SENCO for all children and she will report on the progress of PP children who are also using the programme.

Jude Lang

Class teachers

Data from Nessy can be obtained and assessed at any time for comparison of rates of progress.

 

Software licences and extra tablets. budgeted cost

£2000

 

 

 

Total budgeted cost: 

£66,500

 

Name
 Pupil Premium Grant review 2016_17.pdfDownload
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